Giant Leap | Why the office is being designed to be more like home
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Why the office is being designed to be more like home

06 Mar 2019, Posted by Leah Barnard in Latest News
Interior

Increasingly offices are beginning to look a lot more like our homes. But what is behind this popular global trend?

 

Linda Trim, Director at workplace design specialists Giant Leap said: “The term ‘resi-mercial,’ has been coined to describe this blending of residential and commercial furnishings and feel in the workplace. We are seeing greater numbers of requests for our installations to look more casual and more like home.”

 

Trim noted that it is all about creating a space that people want to be in. When you think that we spend about a third of our lives working, no one wants to feel like they’re in an office.

 

“It’s not so much managing work, home and play but the blending of it.”

 

She added that with more people using laptops instead of desktop computers, people are no longer tethered to a desk. “People pick up their laptops and will perhaps sit or lounge on a couch, much like they do at home.”

 

A more comfortable workspace also appeals to younger employees Trim noted. “This is a really important consideration for companies in competition to attract and retain skilled workers.”

 

A mix of desks and couches is practical too – it makes it easier to do different types of work, from collaborative brainstorming sessions to heads down work.

 

But it’s not just all about adding colourful sofas around the office. Beyond the traditional desk, there are differently sized couches, bar-tall tables let people sit or stand, and even workspaces that resemble a kitchen table or diner are popular.

 

“The right mix of furnishings can create an environment that increases employee engagement and satisfaction, which are considered key drivers to a company’s success. A space plays a role in the cognitive, physical and emotional well-being of workers. In that world, you have to think more about informal spaces,” said Trim.

 

Trim added that home-like offices reduced the sense of hierarchy in offices.

 

“Previously the ‘boss’ would have his own office in the corner while workers sat in rows somewhere else. A more casual environment does away with this old fashioned rigidity and can, therefore, reduce the tension in the workplace.”

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